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1. Was it ethical for Apotex to include a three-year Need more help! 1. Was it ethical for Apotex to include a three-year gag clause in the agreement with Dr. Olivieri? 2. Even though Dr. Olivieri later admitted that she should never have signed the agreement with Apotex that included a confidentiality clause, does the fact that she did sign it have any bearing on her actions here? Why or why not? 3. Was Olivieri’s decision to publish her findings about the trial an example of universalism or utilitarianism? Explain your answer. 4. If we identify the key players in this case as Dr. Olivieri, Apotex, the Hospital for Sick Children, and the University of Toronto, what are the conflicts of interest between them all? 5. What do you think would have happened if Dr. Olivieri’s fellow academics had not supported her in her fight? 6. How could this situation have been handled differently to avoid such a lengthy and bitter battle? In April 1993, Dr. Nancy Olivieri, head of the hemoglobinopathy program at the Hospital for Sick Children (HSC), the teaching hospital for the University of Toronto in Canada, signed an agreement with the Canadian drug company Apotex to undertakeclinical trials on a drug called deferiprone (referred to as L1 during the study). The drug was designed to help children with thalassemia, an inherited blood disorder that can cause the fatal buildup of iron in the blood. The agreement that Olivieri signed with Apotex included a clause (later referred to as a “gag clause”) that specifically prevented the unauthorized release of any findings in the trial for a period of three years: As you now [sic], paragraph 7 of the LA-02 Contract provides that all information whether written or not, obtained or generated by you during the term of the LA-02 Contract and for a period of three years thereafter, shall be and remain secret and confidential and shall not be disclosed in any manner to any third party except with the prior written consent of Apotex. Please be aware that Apotex will take all possible steps to ensure that these obligations of confidentiality are met and will vigorously pursue all legal remedies in the event that there is any breach of these obligations. Students also viewed these Organizational Behavior questions Identify the key players in this case. Describe each player’s role and Identify the key players in this case. Describe each player’s role and their relationship to each other. Describe the IS management position(s) that were missing at Clarion and suggest candidate(s) to fill the roles? What do you think would have happened to Grubhub if it hadn’t What do you think would have happened to Grubhub if it hadn’t changed its business plan? What five specific behaviors do you think would be most important in What five specific behaviors do you think would be most important in giving you an etiquette edge in your business career? What checklist item(s) in Figure 1-12 do you think would be most What checklist item(s) in Figure 1-12 do you think would be most difficult for Ikea, the global furniture, to address? Why? What management skills do you think would be most important for Howard What management skills do you think would be most important for Howard Schultz to have? Why? What skills do you think would be most important for a Starbucks store manager to have? Why? New technology has allowed oil to be pumped from much deeper offshore New technology has allowed oil to be pumped from much deeper offshore oil fields than before. For example, 28 deep ocean rigs operate in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico. a. What effect do you think deep ocean sources have had on the world oil price?b. Who will benefit from drilling for oil in the Gulf of Mexico? Explain your answer. Discuss the various types of inner join operations. Why is theta join Discuss the various types of inner join operations. Why is theta join required? Standard Company has developed standard manufacturing overhead costs based on a capacity Standard Company has developed standard manufacturing overhead costs based on a capacity of…… … labor cost $644,000 Actual direct labor hours worked 165,000 hours Actual variable overhead cost incurred $518,000 Actual fixed overhead cost incurred $860,000 The fixed overhead budget variance… 9. A long, straight coaxial cable consists of two thin, tubular conductors, 9. A long, straight coaxial cable consists of two thin, tubular conductors, the inner of radius a and the outer of radius b. Cur- rent I flows out along one conductor and back along the other. Show that the self-inductance per unit length of the cable is In (bla). 10. 000 F5 F6 F7 FB F4 1. Identify the stage of the life cycle that best describes Cory 1. Identify the stage of the life cycle that best describes Cory and Tisha today. What important financial planning issues characterize this stage? 2. Based on the issues identified in Question 1 and your knowledge of the Dumont household, help Cory and Tisha complete Worksheet 1 to identify their short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term financial goals. 3. Complete a simplified income statement for the Dumonts. (Hints: Data are presented both as background material and as listed annual expenses. Use Worksheet 5 as a guide.) 4. Develop a balance sheet for the Dumonts (see Worksheet 4). Do they have a positive or negative net worth? 5. Using information from the income and expense statements and the balance sheet, calculate the following ratios: a. Current ratio b. Month’s living expenses covered ratio c. Debt ratio d. Long-term debt coverage ratio e. Savings ratio 6. Use the information provided by the ratio analysis to assess the Dumonts’ financial health. (Hint: Use the recommended ratio limits provided in Chapter 2 as guidelines for measuring the Dumonts’ financial flexibility and liquidity.) What recommendations would you make to improve their financial health? 7. Do the Dumonts have an emergency fund? Should they? How much would you recommend that they have in an emergency fund? 8. According to the Money article that Cory and Tisha read, they can expect to pay about $100,000 in tuition and related college expenses when Chad enters college and even more for Haley. The Dumonts hope that Chad will receive academic scholarships that will reduce their total college costs to about $40,000. Assuming that the Dumonts start a college savings program today and manage to earn 7 percent a year, ignoring taxes, until Chad is 18, how much will they need to save each year? How much will the Dumonts need to save each year if Chad does not receive scholarships? See Chapter 3. 9. How much will the Dumonts need to save each year to accumulate $40,000 for Haley to attend college if they can earn 7 percent on their savings? Assuming that the Dumonts need to accumulate $110,000 to fund all of Haley’s college expenses, how much do they need to? See Chapter 3. 10. How much will Tisha’s Great Basin Balanced Mutual Fund shares (currently valued at $2,300) be worth when Chad enters college, assuming the fund returns 7 percent after taxes on an annualized basis? How much will the shares be worth when Haley turns 18 years old? What will be the value of the shares when Tisha retires at age 67, assuming a 9 percent after-tax return and no deductions from the account? What has been the actual annualized rate of return for the fund since Tisha received it as a gift? See Chapter 3. 11. Recall that the Dumonts set up a savings fund for a future down payment with gifts and contributions from their wedding. How much will this market index fund valued at $13,000 be worth in 3, 5, and 7 years if they can earn a current rate of return of 6 percent? How much will the fund be worth in 3, 5, and 7 years if they can obtain an 8 percent rate of return? See Chapter 3. 12. Assuming an 8 percent return for the current year from their market index fund valued at $13,000 and a 15 percent federal marginal tax rate, how much will the Dumonts pay in taxes on their investment, either from their savings or from current income, this year? By how much, after taxes, will their account grow this year? See Chapters 3 and 4. 13. Assuming that Cory does nothing with his 401(k) retirement account from his former employer and that the account grows at a rate of 5 percent annually, how much will Cory have when he retires at 67? If, instead, Cory takes control of the money and invests it in a tax-deferred IRA earning 10 percent annually, how much will he have at age 67? See Chapter 3. 14. Using the income and expense estimates provided by Tisha, calculate the Dumonts’ taxable income using the 2017 tax information provided in the text. (Note: Ignore unearned taxable income from savings and investments.) a. Do the Dumonts have enough tax-deductible expenses to itemize deductions? b. Explain the tax ramifications of Cory’s student loan interest, estimated to be $652 for 2017. c. How much Social Security and Medicare taxes are withheld from Cory’s and Tisha’s income? d. What is the Dumonts’ total federal income tax liability? e. Do the Dumonts qualify for the child tax credit? If so, how will it affect their federal income tax liability? How will a payment or refund be determined? 15. Based on the total Social Security tax, Medicare tax, and federal income tax liabilities calculated above, how close did Tisha come in estimating their tax liability? How does the difference between the estimated and actual tax liabilities change their financial situation? What recommendations would you make? 16. Calculate and interpret for Cory and Tisha the differences among their marginal tax rate, average tax rate, and effective marginal tax rate. How might these rates change with life events, such as salary increases or the purchase of their home? The objective of the Continuing Case is to help you synthesize and integrate the various financial planning concepts you have been learning. The case will help you apply your knowledge of constructing financial statements, assessing financial data and resources, calculating taxes, measuring risk exposures, creating specific financial plans for accumulating assets, and analyzing strengths and weaknesses in financial situations. At the end of each book part, you’ll be asked to help Cory and Tisha Dumont answer their personal finance questions. By the end of the book, you’ll know more about Cory and Tisha than you can imagine. Who knows—maybe you have encountered, or will encounter, the same issues that the Dumonts face. After helping the Dumonts answer their questions, perhaps you will be better equipped to achieve your own financial goals! Background Cory and Tisha Dumont recently read an article on personal financial planning in Money. The article discussed common financial dilemmas that families face throughout the life cycle. After reading the article, Cory and Tisha realized they have a lot to learn. They are considering enrolling in a personal finance course at their local university but feel they need more urgent help right now. Based on record-keeping suggestions in the Money article, Cory and Tisha have put together the following information to help you answer their personal finance questions. 1. Family: Cory and Tisha met in college when they were in their early 20s. They continued to date after graduation, and 6 years ago they got married. Cory is 31 years old. Tisha is 30 years old. Their son, Chad, just turned 4 years old, and their daughter, Haley, is 2 years old. They also have a very fat tabby cat named Ms. Cat. 2. Employment: Cory works as a store manager and makes $45,000 a year. Tisha works as an accountant and earns $53,000 a year. 3. Housing: The Dumonts currently rent a three-bedroom townhome for $2,000 per month, but they hope to buy a house. Tisha indicated that she would like to purchase a home within the next 3 to 5 years. The Dumonts are well on their way to achieving their goal. They opted for a small wedding and applied all gifts and family contributions to a market index mutual fund for their “dream” house. When they last checked, the fund account had a balance of $13,000. 1. Critics have argued that WikiLeaks is now attacking secrecy on all 1. Critics have argued that WikiLeaks is now attacking secrecy on all fronts, with no concern for the consequences of the information posted on its site. Do those actions align with the ethical principles of whistle blowing?2. Does WikiLeaks have an obligation to censor postings to protect innocent… Should you be allowed to surf the Web at work? Why or Should you be allowed to surf the Web at work? Why or why not? Suppose that you take a sample of 100 US adults If the Suppose that you take a sample of 100 US adults If the population proportion of US adults who watch news videos is 036 ?what is the probability that fewer than 30 in your sample will watch news videos? Two thousand frequent business travelers are asked which midwestern city they prefer:…… Two thousand frequent business travelers are asked which midwestern city they prefer:…… … which midwestern city they prefer: Indianapolis, Saint Louis, Chicago, or Milwaukee. One hundred liked Indianapolis best, 450 liked Saint Louis, 1,300 liked Chicago, and the remainder preferred… Namaka Inc. (Namaka) recently purchased new display cases for its retail stores. Namaka Inc. (Namaka) recently purchased new display cases for its retail stores. The display cases…… … first year. c. Suppose the display cases sold at the end of the third year for $25,000. Prepare the journal entry to record the sale and any other journal entries required with respect to… Debbie Davis and Elizabeth Engels Exchanged like kind property. Debbie had an Debbie Davis and Elizabeth Engels Exchanged like kind property. Debbie had an adjusted basis of…… … Elizabeth’s property had an adjusted basis of $9000 and a fair market value of $10,500, and Elizabeth gave Debbie $4500 in cash. Determine Debbie’s and Elizabeth’s realized gain of loss,… Use the same information as in E10-8, except that the warehouse owned Use the same information as in E10-8, except that the warehouse owned by Denver Company has a fair…… … warehouse owned by Denver Company has a fair value of $33,000, and therefore the Bristol Company agrees to pay the Denver Company $3,000 to complete the exchange.RequiredPrepare journal… Under what conditions of bond issuance does a discount on bonds payable Under what conditions of bond issuance does a discount on bonds payable arise? Under what conditions of bond issuance does a premium on bonds payable arise? Related Book For Sale Business Ethics Now 3rd edition (Purchase / Rent)