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In the fantasy world of science fiction, MacLean masterfully manipulates an unusual phenomenon of contagion to delve deep into human psychology. Yet her story reveals much of the heart of patriarchy. Though MacLean does not hold patriarchy responsible directly, the female characters of her story are nourished psychologically by patriarchy. Most of the female characters are accustomed to think in a male way (Davin 19-20). While patriarchy considers the female body as an object of male desire, the women.&nbsp.The folly of patriarchal tendency to construct one’s personality and self-esteem on one’s physical appearance inherently lies in the fact that such an attempt either knowingly or unknowingly is in constant effort to shred one’s individual identity. In fact, patriarchal expectation does the same thing for a woman by robbing a woman of her individual existence and by teaching her to be merely an object male lust. The girls on the spaceship ultimately learn about what desiring a muscular and sturdy male body is. Almost every one of them has desired handsome Pat beside her. But when each of the male characters turns into Pat, they become horrified and retreat in fear: “No one spoke. To change, to be someone else—the idea was strange and horrifying” (MacLean 16).&nbsp.